The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Human rights are rights that we have simply because we are human beings. They are not provided by any state. Universal human rights are the inalienable rights of each of us, regardless of citizenship, gender, nationality or ethnicity, skin color, religion, language or any other characteristics. These include both fundamental rights, including the right to life, and the rights that make our life worth living, including the right to food, education, work, health and liberty.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), adopted by the General Assembly in 1948, proclaimed for the first time in history fundamental human rights that must be protected everywhere. The UDHR turned 70 in 2018 and continues to be the foundation of international human rights law. Article 30 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights contains the principles and essential elements of all existing and future conventions, treaties and other legal instruments in the field of human rights.

The UDHR, together with two covenants, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, constitute the International Bill of Rights.

The principle of universality of human rights is the foundation of international human rights law. This means that we all equally enjoy our human rights. This principle, first proclaimed in the UDHR, is enshrined in many international conventions, declarations and resolutions in the field of human rights.

1.Universal and inalienable

Human rights are inalienable. No one shall be deprived of rights except in individual cases and in accordance with due process of law. For example, the right to freedom may be limited if the court found a person guilty of a crime.

  1. Equality and non-discrimination

Non-discrimination is an integral part of international human rights law. This principle is found in all major human rights treaties. It also underpins two key instruments: the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

  1. Indivisible and interdependent

All human rights are indivisible and interdependent. This means that one category of rights cannot be fully realized without the other. For example, advances in civil and political rights enable better realization of economic, social and cultural rights. At the same time, the violation of economic, social and cultural rights can adversely affect many other rights.

All this is an integral part of a modern democratic society. Because, thereby, there is mutual respect and the desire to improve human life

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o.tuliakov@uabs.sumdu.edu.ua

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Коментарі: 0Публікації: 233Реєстрація: 15-11-2021

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